Free Webinar: Creating Engagement with Voice Tools in Online Courses

Via Scoop.itTeaching Online

THURSDAY, JUNE 9th -In this webinar, participants will learn strategies and techniques for using voice tools to support participant engagement and create personalization in online courses. Continue with this link to view registration information. Please note: Please register at least one hour before the scheduled start time.
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Fab Find: Reviving this blog with help from Scoop.it

A spring filled with an extra serving of doc coursework (it seemed like a good idea at the time)  and a busier than usual  family spring sports calendar has resulted in a few unanticipated outcomes;  more take out for dinner,  an increased reliance on Amazon Prime for mundane shopping needs and a very sad looking blog.

Yet  thanks to Scoop.it, I now can easily, and  efficiently, share my “Fab Finds” via Twitter, WordPress,  Facebook etc. all while being a curator for my own personal content collections.   I come across many Fab Finds each week, but the publishing of these have suffered.  I’ve been wanting an easier way to quickly share and item without compromising quality within the post.  Scoop.it makes it easy for anyone to publish a link to multiple social media sites while organizing them nicely for continued reference and sharing.

I know Scoop.it isn’t the first site out there to claim such wonderful powers, however Scoop.it is the first site for me that adds some zip into my daily work of mining the interwebs on a variety of Ed Tech, eLearning, k12 and higher education related content.

When you create collections Scoop.it attempts to find additional sites  based on the tags you have assigned to your topics. This is a well-intended feature but not its strength. The power is in the Scoop.it bookmarklet that you place on your browser bar so you can scoop as you go. If you are looking for a curating resource that has a powerful and  accurate,social search,  I recommend Storify. 

Scoop.it is in beta, but I did receive my invite in less than 12 hours upon requesting one.  Check it out today!

Actor Network Theory

I am experimenting with Storify (future review post on this new tool). I can post my Storify collections directly to WordPress, but this didn’t seem to go so well on the first run. Below is my embed link to my collection on Actor Network Theory.   And if you are wondering, what the heck is that- some kind of Oscar-prep course? I recommend you look at the resource collection :>) If you are into social networks + the tech tools, then you will really dig the whole actor network theory concept.

Actor Network Theory on Storify

[View the story “Actor Network Theory” on Storify]

5 Presentation Tools for the Online & Face-to-Face Classroom

From EdTech Diva on Flickr

Here are five sites that each offer a specific purpose and tool set for your face-to-face or online presentation needs. From the most basic (showing an image), to the more sophisticated (multimedia mashups), all of these sites can be used by students and instructors to effectively convey content and foster engagement.

Keeping It Basic

Drop Mocks works with your Google account and is perhaps the simplest tool I’ve seen yet. All you do is just drag your  image file on to the web browser screen and…. viola!  Your presentation is born. If you don’t think anything is that easy, just watch this demo. Each Drop Mock generates a URL for easy sharing.  I appreciate the simplicity and recommend Drop Mocks when you need to create an image-based slide show on the fly. Also, this is a fairly easy tool for young children to use too.

At this time, Drop Mocks only works in the latest versions of Google Chrome or Firefox 4. Also, you can only use common image file formats such as jpg, png, gif, and tiff.  Each drop mock generates a URL for easy sharing, but no embed codes at this time. Despite this, it’s still pretty easy and slick.

Moving Beyond Slides

Prezi was the belle of the ball in 2010 and it seems everyone is still buzzing about this alternative presentation tool. This Prezi ,created by Adam Somlai-Fischer, is both a great prezi example that explains how Prezi’s are different than traditional slideshows. Overall, Prezi allows you to break a way from bulleted text and sequential viewing of your slides. You can still use images (and bulleted text) and you can even embed video.  If you work best brainstorming and organizing with mind maps, then Prezi may feel very fluid and natural to you.

Check out this Learning to Play Math Prezi to get a feel of the potential of Prezi.

Media Mashups Made Easy

I did a review of VuVox last week (full review here). In summary,  VuVox lets you do a lot, without needing a lot of high-tech know-how. Students and teachers can generate impressive multimedia collages and panoramas of their work.  VuVox can easily import RSS feeds, and your photo collections from Flickr, Picasa, and Smug Mug.  Add soundtracks and annotate your creations with comments and links to other websites. I find at its core, you can do a lot with VuVox , whether its making a static presentation, or creating interactive content. View an example from the NIHF STEM School in Akron, Ohio or one about Second Life.

Amplify Your Existing Slides

myBrainShark is the individual, free version, of the Brainshark product suite. Brainshark allows you to upload PowerPoints, MS Word documents, and pictures that you can then narrate and share with friend, co-workers, students, etc (you get the point). The site also provides a podcast and video recording option too.  And….drum roll please, you can add your Prezi into Brainshark too. Brainshark is a  great option if you are looking to personalize and add audio to your work, but do not require responses or audio feedback from your viewers. This is an excellent tool for students to generate presentations in as well. Presenters can even record audio by calling in on their phones. The downside: to use the free version you must leave your content  viewable to the public.

Engage and Interact

I describe VoiceThread as an “audio/visual discussion board.” I often turn to Voicethreads when needing to facilitate discussion about a topic. This is a favorite site for educators desiring a way to create more engagement, interaction, and feedback on academic work. This is also an excellent tool for students to present their own content and solicit feedback.

Unlike the previous examples, Voicethread really is a service that you load your pre-designed content into (usually developed in PowerPoint, but PDFs, image files, documents, and movie files). So while you are not authoring content from scratch in Voicethread, you are using Voicethread to enhance the learning experience by engaging viewers in direct conversation and interaction throughout the piece. Because of its audio and video features, many people forget that Voicethread is a not live broadcasting tool. Comments are recorded and listened to at the viewers convenience. Voicethreads can be made public or private, making this a great choice in the education community.  Some excellent examples include of Voicethread include:

Digital Writing Workshop

Picture Writing (K-3 example)

Voicethread on Integration of Voicethread in Online Learning

Voicethread Integrating SmartBoard Images

There are many, many, more presentations tools to consider. While this posting was more focused on visual and interactive options, other educator favorites include Google Presentation (part of Google docs) and Slideshare for posting Powerpoints for viewing.  In the next year expect to see some new releases  that blend social media features into the presentation experience. I am particularly looking forward to testing Storify.

Fab Find: VuVox Multimedia Collage Tool

VuVox’s tagline is media creation, made easy, and they are absolutely right!  I started fiddling with VuVox a couple of years ago, impressed with its ability to create simple, streaming photo collages that had a very polished look and feel. So when Lesley University faculty member Louise Pascale asked my ideas about creating a presentation featuring her photographs from her  trip to Afghanastan, I knew VuVox was the best tool for the job. Louise had three primary needs for this project; that she could easily show the final product online and face-to-face, creation of it would be an easy and intuitive process, and the finished product would look professional and polished without requiring the services of a designer.

Louise refers to her finished VuVox as her backdrop for face-to-face talks. As she speaks, VuVox scrolls behind her, providing power visuals as she shares the story of her visit and project. The combination of Louise’s talk, with the panoramic VuVox canvas, creates a memorable and striking talk.

VuVox allows you to embed media such as audio files, video, and links (see demo below). And while there are plenty of software options that have the same features, VuVox’s strength is in the polished quality and its panoramic style that makes it a distinctive choice for your work.  You can annotate and add text to your presentations as well as pull in RSS feeds if you are using the VuVox Express option. You can also pull in your photo collections from Flickr, Picasa, and SmugMug.  VuVox has expanded its offerings to include a variety of templates, creative layouts and designs for you to present your work. I find this to be an excellent option for students who are looking for ways to create multimedia presentations or even portfolios of their work. They have also launched VuVox Studio for more sophisticated multimedia editing and creations.

Once you create your first VuVox you can embed your presentation in any website or view directly from the VuVox site. The one downer about VuVox is that you must be online to use and access it. I hope that in the coming months the developers add an option to download content for offline viewing and work. (If they do I suspect this will be for a fee, now VuVox is free). VuVox has added more sophistication and options and has deepened their support documentation and tutorials. I find their documentation to be pretty solid and easy to understand which makes VuVox use and development a breeze for the average user of technology and photo sharing websites.

Be sure to check out VuVox and consider using it for your next multimedia presentation.

VuVox Examples;


 

Washington DC Prepares for Obama

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RICK ROCAMORA

Washington D.C. prepares for the inauguration of the 44th President of the United States of America Barack Hussein Obama. Millions are expected on the day of the inauguration, but as the city gets ready, visitors are already experiencing the euphoria of Obama’s election.

see more of my photos

Washington DC Prepares for Obama

This Verizon Customer is Sticking With Her Droid (for now)

Before I launch in to explaining myself, a disclaimer;

I am not a wireless expert, a mobile phone operating system guru, nor a pundit on the topic of mobiles.  I have been buying Apple products for 15 years now and a fan of their design. I am just an everyday user of technology.

Okay, now to the explaining.

When the  iPhone first arrived years ago I had a severe case of gadget envy, even though I don’t fancy myself as a gadget geek.  Yet a prior, very negative experience with AT&T, kept me from taking the plunge . No amount of awesomeness was going to sway me to switch. And besides, Verizon (especially at the time of the iPhone launch) had a much superior network for my travel needs.  The pragmatist in me also knew that it was likely that Verizon and the other companies would launch products to compete with the iPhone,  as this is the cycle of innovation and tech.

Instead, I received a first generation iTouch which mostly addressed my  iPhone pangs. Because I spend most of my time in wireless environments, I could essentially use the iTouch as I would an iPhone (well except for the talking, but who really talks these days on their phones?).  I downloaded the common apps to try.  As an experiment, I even used my iTouch through most of the ISTE10 conference this past summer (with the exception of the keynotes where the wireless was laggy and bad).

While I embraced my iTouch, I also upgraded to a Motorola Droid as it was the most reasonable option for my needs. It had some similarity to the iPhone/iTouch. And, as the title of this post suggests I love it.  I love both really, but as a handheld computer/phone/multipurpose device I really appreciate the Droid OS design and ability to multitask. If there is anything that drives me a bit batty on the iPhones/iTouches, and iPads (our household has one of these too) is that they are at their best when you are single tasking.  I realized I expect my smart phone to do more than one thing at time and  do it well. All things I find with my Droid. And also, when you get down to it, most of the popular, common apps are the same across the platforms. I don’t really feel like I am using something that is soooo different.

Now Apple fans I know you may take me to task, and that’s fine. Please refer back up to my disclaimer.  This is just one consumer’ s point of view. But I do find this iPhone v. Droid business a bit apples to oranges some days.  The iPhone is the device + plus the OS. The Droid OS is available on a variety of devices (and providers); so as user you can choose a touch screen only experience (like iPhone) or select devices that utilizes the pullout keyboard (BTW -When I got the Motorola Droid I thought I would use the keyboard more. I barely touch it, probably because I am so used to using touch screen on my iTouch).  For a Droid customer you can choose the device that you are most comfortable using. So when I am talking about the iPhone I am really thinking software, I am not thinking about physical phone design itself.

So I wonder, after the iPhone/Verizon hype dies down a bit, how many Droid/Blackberry/Windows OS folks who switch to the iPhone ultimately end up going back to what they had? It’s just something to think about.  For me, I could use either, but after having my Droid I am not sure that I have a compelling reason to switch (yet).  The iPhone OS 4 is not that big of change from the previous version (or so I am told by experts and friends).  If that’s the case, I am going to continue enjoying what I have.

Of course I do realize there is a whole status thing of having an iPhone.  As an educator, I think of all the girls that came back after the Xmas/New Years break with their brand new Uggs. Ugg knock-offs might provide the same cozy warmth (function) and similar style, but they still are not an Ugg. I can see where there is parity in the mobile phone realm that we will sacrifice a bit of function for the perfect or envied form. And for many Verizon customers that alone is worth the plunge because we have been waiting so long to make it to the cool kids table (and there is nothing wrong with that).

As I approach middle age I am bit more of a pragmatist on things. And I don’t see the Droid OS as a knock-off either.  I think it is a solid piece of  software that I hope continues to innovate, especially as Verizon now offers pretty much every mainstream mobile OS to its customer base. The competition will be interesting and fierce (I hope).

But this brings me to me last thought. Wouldn’t it be swell to get the nice physical design of the iPhone that could run the mobile OS of your choice?  Hahahahaha, that’s a good laugh but I can dream can’t I?