#ISTE11 Resources: Be there without being there

Get the best of ISTE11 without being there

If you can’t be there (or if you are like me you are only here for a day), here are some nifty, easy resources that will help you join in on some of the really cool and awesome stuff going on in Philly this year.

  • ISTE’s Daily Leader: A pdf newspaper that highlights all things ISTE and also announces schedule changes, additions, etc to the program.
  • Subscribe to the #ISTE11 Paper.li daily. Powered by the tweets of ISTE attendees, it provides a rich resource of ISTE happenings.  Many tweets also share links to content that is being presented during conference sessions.  Another great thing is that that it will continue to have momenteum at least a couple of weeks after the coference.
  • Follow the #ISTE11 Hashtag on twitter. You don’t need to be a tweeter to following #ISTE11 on Twitter. Simply go to the Twitter.com and enter #ISTE11 as a search term and viola, you will have a steady stream of tweeting ISTERs to follow.
  • ISTEUnplugged – Steve Hargadon & Friends will be broadcasting sessions from the Bloggers Cafe at ISTE. Unplugged started last year (I think) from Denver and had a great success. Unplugged is like a unconference during the conference where folks can gather and generate their own sessions on the fly, and some are even Ustreamed or viewable via Elluminate/Bb Collaborate  so Tune In!

Are there other great ways to follow ISTE from a far? Share your ideas and links

This Verizon Customer is Sticking With Her Droid (for now)

Before I launch in to explaining myself, a disclaimer;

I am not a wireless expert, a mobile phone operating system guru, nor a pundit on the topic of mobiles.  I have been buying Apple products for 15 years now and a fan of their design. I am just an everyday user of technology.

Okay, now to the explaining.

When the  iPhone first arrived years ago I had a severe case of gadget envy, even though I don’t fancy myself as a gadget geek.  Yet a prior, very negative experience with AT&T, kept me from taking the plunge . No amount of awesomeness was going to sway me to switch. And besides, Verizon (especially at the time of the iPhone launch) had a much superior network for my travel needs.  The pragmatist in me also knew that it was likely that Verizon and the other companies would launch products to compete with the iPhone,  as this is the cycle of innovation and tech.

Instead, I received a first generation iTouch which mostly addressed my  iPhone pangs. Because I spend most of my time in wireless environments, I could essentially use the iTouch as I would an iPhone (well except for the talking, but who really talks these days on their phones?).  I downloaded the common apps to try.  As an experiment, I even used my iTouch through most of the ISTE10 conference this past summer (with the exception of the keynotes where the wireless was laggy and bad).

While I embraced my iTouch, I also upgraded to a Motorola Droid as it was the most reasonable option for my needs. It had some similarity to the iPhone/iTouch. And, as the title of this post suggests I love it.  I love both really, but as a handheld computer/phone/multipurpose device I really appreciate the Droid OS design and ability to multitask. If there is anything that drives me a bit batty on the iPhones/iTouches, and iPads (our household has one of these too) is that they are at their best when you are single tasking.  I realized I expect my smart phone to do more than one thing at time and  do it well. All things I find with my Droid. And also, when you get down to it, most of the popular, common apps are the same across the platforms. I don’t really feel like I am using something that is soooo different.

Now Apple fans I know you may take me to task, and that’s fine. Please refer back up to my disclaimer.  This is just one consumer’ s point of view. But I do find this iPhone v. Droid business a bit apples to oranges some days.  The iPhone is the device + plus the OS. The Droid OS is available on a variety of devices (and providers); so as user you can choose a touch screen only experience (like iPhone) or select devices that utilizes the pullout keyboard (BTW -When I got the Motorola Droid I thought I would use the keyboard more. I barely touch it, probably because I am so used to using touch screen on my iTouch).  For a Droid customer you can choose the device that you are most comfortable using. So when I am talking about the iPhone I am really thinking software, I am not thinking about physical phone design itself.

So I wonder, after the iPhone/Verizon hype dies down a bit, how many Droid/Blackberry/Windows OS folks who switch to the iPhone ultimately end up going back to what they had? It’s just something to think about.  For me, I could use either, but after having my Droid I am not sure that I have a compelling reason to switch (yet).  The iPhone OS 4 is not that big of change from the previous version (or so I am told by experts and friends).  If that’s the case, I am going to continue enjoying what I have.

Of course I do realize there is a whole status thing of having an iPhone.  As an educator, I think of all the girls that came back after the Xmas/New Years break with their brand new Uggs. Ugg knock-offs might provide the same cozy warmth (function) and similar style, but they still are not an Ugg. I can see where there is parity in the mobile phone realm that we will sacrifice a bit of function for the perfect or envied form. And for many Verizon customers that alone is worth the plunge because we have been waiting so long to make it to the cool kids table (and there is nothing wrong with that).

As I approach middle age I am bit more of a pragmatist on things. And I don’t see the Droid OS as a knock-off either.  I think it is a solid piece of  software that I hope continues to innovate, especially as Verizon now offers pretty much every mainstream mobile OS to its customer base. The competition will be interesting and fierce (I hope).

But this brings me to me last thought. Wouldn’t it be swell to get the nice physical design of the iPhone that could run the mobile OS of your choice?  Hahahahaha, that’s a good laugh but I can dream can’t I?

RFP Lesley University Academic Technology Institute January 19th

14th Annual Academic Technology Institute Request for Proposals

Each year I run an internal Technology & eLearning Institute for Lesley faculty and academic staff. This year we are  want to open it up to regional presenters from other Boston schools and educational organizations.  Below is our RFP and link to apply to present at the Institute.  Presenters get free registration. We are unable to support transportation costs, etc.

The Institute provides three session formats -A traditional presentation, a BYOL (bring your own laptop) for skills training or how-to’s and a digital poster session. Digital poster sessions are like traditional posters, except we provide you a data projector for you to display your work.  Traditional posters are also welcome.

If you have any questions please contact me at rpeterse [at] lesley [dot] edu.

RFP  Guidelines and Submission Form

Faculty and Academic Administrators and educators from the broader community are invited to submit proposals to present at Lesley’s 14th Annual Academic Technology Institute to be held on Wednesday, January 19th from 9am-4pm in University Hall. The day will feature a variety of sessions ranging from traditional presentations, to hands-on demonstrations, to digital poster sessions. Please consider sharing your work, whether it is a specific assignment from a course, or perhaps research you are currently engaged in.

Some examples of presentation topics and formats include:

  • Innovative uses of media and technology in teaching and scholarship
  • Teaching and learning with mobile devices
  • Fostering engagement, collaboration, and communication with/through technology
  • Multimedia/Video/Digital Storytelling
  • Exploration of trends in social media
  • Assessment and reflection using digital media
  • Next Generation and Millennial Learning Needs and Styles
  • Poster presentations on research or teaching related to the use of digital media or instructional uses of media in face-to-face, hybrid, and online environments

Presentations may be as a group or individual. Presenters will select one of the following presentation formats to share:

  • Traditional Concurrent Session: These are presentations or discussions of a topic or concept (60 minutes).
  • Bring Your Own Laptop (BYOL): These are presentations that encourage hands-on exploration of specific websites or tools. Participants will bring their own laptops to participate.
  • Digital Poster Session: Presentations held at the end of the day, in a poster-style format, utilizing projection and traditional mediums to present a concept, idea, or specific piece of work and research
  • We might be able to offer one or two Skyped-in or Elluminate presentations. If you are interested in this option, please contact me directly to discuss.

The full RFP and Guidelines are available here: http://lesley.edu/elis/ati/ati2011/rfp.html

To go directly to the online submission form go here: http://tinyurl.com/ati2011proposals

It’s #ISTE10 OMG!

After 24 hours of ISTE10  it was hard to tell which hurt more: my feet or my brain. So much to see and learn (an understatement of gross proportion). I’ve dusted off ye olde blog to brain dump a few things observed and learned. Below is the list of topics covered in this post for easy peasy reading and skimming:

  • EduBlogger
  • The Power of People: Twitter Thoughts
  • Apple+iPad= UnSponsorship Award
  • Go look at these guys: It’s Learning, Shmoop, Adaptive Curriculum, Tech4Learning and BrainPop (of course!).

First off– pretty much all of EduBloggerCon (#ebc10) was quality and one of the best experiences so far at ISTE. A big thanks to Steve Hargadon & colleagues for their organization of this. The icing on the cake is that it was free –no extra pre-registration to participate! The Tech Smackdown after lunch highlighted some quality up and coming tools and I was thrilled to see the collaborative writing tool Storybird included. My students and I have dabbled with this site and I think there is a lot of potential for this site. I’ll post  my thoughts separately on the whole “Are Wikis Dying” conversation I participated in. Short answer: No/Yes/Maybe.

People Power: Twitter

TwitterIf there was an award for the 10,000 pound gorilla in the room it is  Twitter. Most sessions so far have had very active backchannels, which provides a mix of amusement, enables connections between attendees, provides avenues for rich resource sharing and also a chance for those of us locked out of the full sessions due to fire code (or virtually attending),  to follow along . Most importantly, since there is so much good stuff going on, you can benefit from fuller conference coverage, especially through the use of the new tool paper.li  and the #ISTE10 “newspaper” powered by Tweets. But the real story isn’t about Twitter; it’s about how people are working together, in generally helpful and useful ways, through the backchannel. I don’t know if I would go as far as to say the #iste10 hashtag is trasformative but I do think it’s been an essential positive part of my experience.

The pervasiveness of Twitter makes me wonder if ISTE will give us a field on our name badges next year to prominently display our Twitter Ids? I can only speak for myself, but I  will recognize a Twitter name before the  real name of a person. Hmmm, what does this mean???

Apple is here –right?
If you were to award UnSponsorship from a company that would go to Apple.  Apple’s full force presence in the exhibits is conspicuously absent this year. But, from the looks of things, does it matter? I’ve seen lots and lots and lots and lots (did I say lots?) of iPads this week in use by attendees. These are followed by iBooks, iTouches and iPhones.The iPad is being handed out as prize candy by vendors everywhere.  There are little sessions popping up through the unplugged portion of the conference about the iPad. The EduBlogger conference also featured a session on the iPad.  Apple has the best kind of visibility with everyone using their stuff this week.

Products, Tools, and “Good Stuff”
So this is just it’s own separate post for later. Some highlights:

If you are shopping for interesting ways to host/facilitate your courses walk right past Blackboard and Moodle and head straight to It’s Learning and Edmodo.   Heck, even if you are not shopping or the lead decision maker in your school/district, just go look at what’s possible to be inspired! Both vendors are in the way back of the exhibits and around the corner from each other.  I have to say It’s Learning is elegant and just makes sense. One nice feature allows video capture and audio comments right into the course site without extra authoring software. It just makes sense and takes the techie out of the learning. Edmodo is known best for its Facebook like look, feel, and features which gives it some nice familiarity for students.

I’ve been a long time fan of Tech4Learning, BrainPop, and Adaptive Curriculum. Shmoop is new on the scene and is worth a look too. Go say hi to these student-centered folks.

In Summary:
There is soooo much more to say –like the great sessions and conversations I’ve had, which are the most important parts of this conference and really require my brain to do a bit better at synthesizing for a posting. Globalization and our social responsibility is a recurrent theme and I just can not cover that well in 5 minutes or less of typing!

So what have you seen? What are your thoughts on Twitter? Vendors? Ideas that you find worth sharing ( riff on #TEDxDenverED).  The floor is yours.