Practical Pedagogy (or just tell me what to do as long as it is backed up by science)

You could trace my posting (or lack of posting ) back to two basic realities -completing my Ed.D while taking on a new gig at edX in 2012.

It has been almost two years to the day since my last posting.

Okay this previous sentence sounds a wee bit too much like the opening line of confession with a priest. So forgive me, my non existent readership for my benign neglect.

I have come back up for air at the end of my Ed.D and transitioned to a new gig at HarvardX. This means that I have boatloads of additional time to wax poetic again in the digital learning space -right? Actually, I’ve never waxed poetic about digital learning (I don’t think…..). And I don’t know about the boatloads of time, but there is a definitely a bit more space.

The title of this post is a bit of joke -as I’ve always thought the first part would be a great title of a handbook for instructional designers and course developers who work with faculty. (Maybe I will even get around to publishing said book , of course my track record with blogging is evidence that this might just be a whimsical dream.) But since the big data bang ushered in by MOOCs, practical isn’t enough -we need (and should have) more evidence-based design practices.

So after two + years in MOOC land (and still going strong), I remain bemused about the current state of instructional design as well as the promise learning analytics and big data to in this space. Interestingly though, I don’t often find instructional design crossing streams with data folks (emphasis on often). My intention is to dust of this space and use it for reflective practice on bridging the theoretical to evidence-based examples to advance my own practice of practical pedagogy.

My new TED- RSA: 21st Century Enlightenment

Via Scoop.itHigher Ed Faculty

RSA is my new TED (though TED still holds a special place in my heart). Also, I realize that RSA & TED are not same/sam, but there are worthy comparisons and find that their site, inclusive of their famous RSAnimate talks. Please look at this site for their publications other wonderful programs related to social change, new thinking theory, and just plain old other cool stuff.
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#ISTE11 Resources: Be there without being there

If you can’t be there (or if you are like me you are only here for a day), here are some nifty, easy resources that will help you join in on some of the really cool and awesome stuff going on in Philly this year.

  • ISTE’s Daily Leader: A pdf newspaper that highlights all things ISTE and also announces schedule changes, additions, etc to the program.
  • Subscribe to the #ISTE11 Paper.li daily. Powered by the tweets of ISTE attendees, it provides a rich resource of ISTE happenings.  Many tweets also share links to content that is being presented during conference sessions.  Another great thing is that that it will continue to have momenteum at least a couple of weeks after the coference.
  • Follow the #ISTE11 Hashtag on twitter. You don’t need to be a tweeter to following #ISTE11 on Twitter. Simply go to the Twitter.com and enter #ISTE11 as a search term and viola, you will have a steady stream of tweeting ISTERs to follow.
  • ISTEUnplugged - Steve Hargadon & Friends will be broadcasting sessions from the Bloggers Cafe at ISTE. Unplugged started last year (I think) from Denver and had a great success. Unplugged is like a unconference during the conference where folks can gather and generate their own sessions on the fly, and some are even Ustreamed or viewable via Elluminate/Bb Collaborate  so Tune In!

Are there other great ways to follow ISTE from a far? Share your ideas and links

Crowdsource our ISTE Experience

#ISTE11 is officially/unoffically under way.  EduBloggerCon rocked as usual this morning lead by the amazing Mr. Steve Hargadon.  And now we have TEDxPhiladelphiaED happening. 

I don’t actually touch down in Philly until Tuesday morning and then I will turn around that evening and head back home. So yes folks, I have 12 hours at ISTE this  year, which is still better than 0 hours. I’ve named my impending trip the ISTE Dash & Crash.  (Crash as in sleep people –not trying for a plane, train or car wreck here).  

Collaborative Blogging Anyone? The Twitterverse has been humming with fabulous shares from the events this weekend, so I am thankful for being in the loop from today’s happenings (though nothing beats really being there). There will be plenty of Paper.li feeds to read as well as individual blog posts from attendees to fill in what you are missing. However, what if there was a giant collaborative blog for folks to post their finds and sightings to. What if you could simply email your pics, vids, and thoughts and it would immediately post to a blog?  I have a couple of friends who have tentatively said “heck ya let’s do it” to this idea. So I set up this ISTE Posterous site where we could do just that.  If you are interested in contributing to a collaborative, crowd-sourced ISTE Blog— drop me a line by clicking on the contact info for this site. You can easily email a picture, video, document, or posting to this blog and it will be posted (and tweeted). 

If you are not at ISTE, but merely flowing the webcasts and Tweets, you can participate too! Share your favorite tweets, observations, resources etc.

I am well aware that I should have had my act together on this crowdsourced blog thingy awhile ago to actually guarantee contributors. Next time!  Until then, I have to rely on the genoursity of a few thousand educators willing to contribute their finds and experiences. 

 

 

 

Mike Matas: A next-generation digital book | Video on TED.com

Via Scoop.itWeb 2.0 Educator

TED Talks Software developer Mike Matas demos the first full-length interactive book for the iPad — with clever, swipeable video and graphics and some very cool data visualizations to play with.
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Blogs Elbow Up to Journal Status in New Academic-Publishing Venture – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Via Scoop.itHigher Ed Faculty

Today’s Chronicle article about Dan Cohen’s latest, work, PressForward, was music to the eyes. At this time last year I was completing a lit review on the status of “digital scholarship” in academia. One of the sticky spots was how to treat blogs, especially as they do not originate in the gold standard of print, nor are they likely to be seen as legit peer-reviewed work.

My interest in the topic is two-fold: As a budding scholar myself and as an administrator who must find ways to help faculty bring more technology into their teaching. The recognition of digital works as real scholarship is essential for the advancement of academe. It provides incentive for faculty to take risk while evolving our ideas of scholarly publishing.

Bravo to Dan Cohen & peers for their progressive work in this area and the launch of PressForward. Looking forward to how this unfolds and develops.
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Free Webinar: Creating Engagement with Voice Tools in Online Courses

Via Scoop.itTeaching Online

THURSDAY, JUNE 9th -In this webinar, participants will learn strategies and techniques for using voice tools to support participant engagement and create personalization in online courses. Continue with this link to view registration information. Please note: Please register at least one hour before the scheduled start time.
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